Friday, August 31, 2012

Lesser-Known Cues

Wouldn't it be awesome if our bodies were equipped with a lighting system, in regards to exercise?!





For example:
Green would mean "Go run, walk, bike, swim...go go go!!"

Yellow would indicate a need for rest "take it easy until you see the green light, again"

Red would, of course, mean to "STOP. Cease all activity immediately!"

(p.s. If I were designing this feature, I'd have it installed on the belly button. It's about time we got some use out of that thing, anyway.)

Obviously, we are forced to resort to obsessing over other, less obvious signs to determine our daily capabilites.

"If it hurts to walk, don't run". (I would also add "don't walk", but maybe that's a given)

"If the pain forces you to alter your gait, don't run"

 
Middlest demonstrating "altered gait"
 
"If you're feeling sick anywhere from the neck down, don't run" (wins prize for "most-ignored")
 
"Palpate the injured area. If there's pain, don't run"
 
"Do not run until you can hop on the injured leg, without pain"
 
 
"Duh"
 
Most of the classic, dire warnings, are fairly cut and dry. Some are left up to the delusional  athlete's interpretation, though. I, personally, drove myself (more) crazy, trying to determine when it would be safe to try running after I was injured.
 
The following are a few, lesser-known, rules-of-thumb I have been using lately. They're pretty darned practical and way more definitive than "If you're limping, take a day or two off" .
 
You're out for your gentle walk, and the creepy sidewalk guy starts heading your way. If you determine that you can run away from him, if necessary, you might be healed!
 
 
If you are not nervous about heating up and eating your favorite "ice pack" for lunch , it might be okay to start running!
 
 



You are surely on the road to recovery when the sight of stairs doesn't make you break into a cold sweat.
 
If you have lingering pain, go see your doctor, physical therapist, chiropractor...some sort of trusted medical professional. When you decide to ignore or out-think them, though, feel free to reference these handy tips.
 
You're welcome.
 
Any good ones to add?